Tag Archives: Placement woes

Ring in the new year!

Happy New Year to you! What a year 2014 was; some good, a fair bit of not-so-good…

The Japanese celebrate New Year with a number of interesting traditions. It is one of the most important dates in the calendar here. One of my favourite traditions is the eating of 年越しそば and any tradition which involves eating food is going to please me!

toshikoshisoba-2010

This is a simple yet delicious recipe for Year Crossing Noodles!

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Welcome to the working world.

Goodbye lie ins, going to sleep at silly o clock, and hello 6 am starts, 10 pm bedtime and a lifestyle with routine.

The working world isn’t what I had it cut out to be if I’m going to be honest. I thought I would be enjoying the perks of being a working adult and having £’s to spend without having to work out how much I had left to spend per week until the next loan drops (maybe that’s just me!). However, I was not completely prepared for the amount of work and learning I was about to take on or how tired I would feel in the first few weeks of my placement. Gone were the days when I could go to sleep whenever I wanted without a care about tomorrow. I knew now that I had to be on the ball at work the next day, so waking up feeling exhausted was not the best idea when every day brought new knowledge and new experiences.

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“Questions”. – A day in the life of an Erasmus student

Erasmus. New day, new questions. Rhetorical, of course.

What time do I have classes today?
What happened last night?
How late am I already?
How many times will I use my translator app today?
How fast will my french teachers talk?
And, will I actually understand it this time?

Completing an Erasmus in France often poses theses type of questions.

However, although there’s this idea that the Erasmus year is pure partying with a side of study, and yes, this may be true elsewhere, it seems that Sciences Po Lille doesn’t quite understand the simple needs of the average student. Maybe this got lost in translation, who knows.

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