Tag Archives: careers

Maintaining a start-up culture

With so many big graduate companies vying for your attention, it can be easy to overlook the smaller companies when you are planning your future. Yet this could be a massive mistake as they offer big opportunities!

We caught up with Andrew Jervis, Co-Founder of ClickMechanic, to find out more about start-ups and the benefits of working at one…

What is start-up culture?

Business culture in start-ups is usually seen one of two ways: the 100 hour work weeks or the breakfast bar and sleeping pods of Google. Luckily, most start-ups are a nice balance of the two with more relaxed working environments but the expectation that you’ll go above and beyond as part of your role. Along with all the company socials and charity events found in most corporate jobs, you may also get Friday beer nights and a greater emphasis on mingling between teams with lunch and learns.

The actual working environment involves a lot more independence by employees being able to create their own process and take on responsibility themselves. These are core values in most start-ups as it encourages innovation rather than following a script.

What does ‘start-up culture’ mean at ClickMechanic?

Our key values as a team are independence and transparency. These values drive how ClickMechanic employees collaborate together in creating a better product. A traditional way of doing this has been to hold monthly update meetings with the entire company present. These forums allow every team to feedback ways they have succeeded, failed, and upcoming projects they aim to work on. It is a good reflection of our practices in general that allow any new intern to contact everyone from other teams or the founders with questions and suggestions. The trust that is put into our staff is rewarded by fresh ideas and determined work.

As the business scales, how do you maintain the start-up culture?

By empowering employees, their ideas can feed straight back into the company, shifting how their team and the wider company work. Every idea has some nugget of gold, even the silly ones, as they can hint to deeper thoughts and feelings. Reading into concerns and noticing patterns around the workplace have definitely helped us stop some roadblocks between teams forming.

As the team has grown, there have introduced several methods to help teams collaborate on projects or just catch some lunch together to bump heads. Good ideas are constantly falling out that change the product or the site which is invaluable.

Do you miss anything about the early days of ClickMechanic?

There are many stories of early start-up life – working sleepless nights and weekends – and they are generally true. Your main aim in the early days is to launch quickly, learn, and iterate on what you have created. Pouring sweat and sore eyes into the project lead to incredible personal achievements when milestones are hit.

The breakthroughs, record days, and partnerships were all self-propelled in the early days which definitely makes them special. Our journey through two employees in a living room, to four in a co-working space, to the 20-30 people in three offices has been an incredible journey and has brought unique challenges at each stage.

If you would like to know more about start-ups or ClickMechanic, then please get in touch with austin@clickmechanic.com or through their website.

If you want to find out more about the big opportunities an SME or start-up could offer you, we are here to help! Visit our dedicated webpage: www.aston.ac.uk/sme, join in the conversation on social media using the hashtag #AstonSMEs or come and speak to us in the Careers+Placements Centre. Don’t forget, you can also explore a range of placement and graduate opportunities at SMEs on Aston Futures.

From placement student at Nestlé to graduate at Capgemini

Sandy Nijjar graduated from Aston in 2015 with a BSc Computing for Business degree. She completed her placement year at Nestlé and now works as a Business Transformation Consultant at Capgemini.

What were your key highlights/projects/achievements on placement?

My key achievement was being given the sole responsibility to manage the field sales solution for six months and supporting over 700 field sales users and the field sales capture tool Visicom. I had worked closely with the market contact within Germany, Nestlé retail operations team and other international support teams.

How did you go about finding your placement?

I used Aston Futures and looked on company websites for placement roles.

How has Aston University helped you prepare for graduate employment?

The Careers+Placements team at Aston University held a number of sessions with companies that equipped me with skills that I could use for my graduate employment.

How did you secure your graduate role?

I applied to a number of different graduate schemes earlier in my final year and juggled my coursework deadlines and exam prep.

My best careers advice to another student would be…

Make the most of all the opportunities available at Aston University. Attend career sessions and network with employers during these events. I would also recommend to apply to graduate roles early in your final year.

We’re here to help you navigate your next adventure – for up to three years after you graduate! Visit us in the Careers+Placements Centre today to discover how we can support your career search.

My career journey so far…

Maya Modi graduated from Aston University in 2016 with a degree in BSc English Language. She is now working as a Consultant at Capgemini. Here she tells us about her career journey so far. 

Where did you undertake your placement?

I split my placement year up into three parts: a semester studying abroad, a semester working in the UK and a summer studying abroad. The studying elements were obtained via Aston and I located the working placement myself.

For the first semester of my placement year, I was an ERASMUS student at Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain. I then came home and spent the second semester picking up my former role within my local Accident & Emergency department. Finally, I spent the summer studying Chinese Sociopolitics at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

What were your key highlights/projects/achievements on placement?

Given the placements I was doing, it was difficult to be involved in high profile projects as such, but that didn’t stop me from getting involved with high profile individuals. The lecturers I worked with hailed from renowned universities such as Yale, Harvard and Princeton, so the pressure was on to impress them! My lecturers praised my work, which was a great feeling considering the subjects I was studying were alien to me. I’m also not fluent in Spanish or Cantonese, so adjusting to lecture content was difficult, but I got through it.

How did you go about finding your placement?

I checked Aston Futures religiously for the opening of study abroad applications, as I knew that was what I wanted to do. I mostly liaised with the Careers+Placements team as my main source of finding and securing placements.

How has Aston University helped you prepare for graduate employment?

I think the amount of careers fairs that are open to us are fantastic. I attended most of them, even the ones irrelevant to me. You can practise how to approach recruiters and learn to ask the right questions. I also really liked that Careers+Placements can arrange mock interviews for you and do CV checks.

How did you secure your graduate role?

I attended careers fairs out of my comfort zone to expand the industries I could fit into post-graduation. ‘High Tea Meets IT’ was a careers fair targeted at females wanting to go into the technology industry and we all had high tea together. This was where I met my current employer and from then on, I applied to their graduate scheme via their website.

My best careers advice to another student would be…

I started my LinkedIn page before university. The earlier you start it, the sooner you’ll learn to use it properly. I’d already made a fair few contacts, including graduate recruiters, but as soon as I’d updated my profile to show a placement year my connection requests went crazy!

Your placement year is the thing that’ll differentiate you from the next candidate. Don’t be afraid to mention that you embarked on a placement year!

Keep all of the applications you got rejected from and the CV/cover letters you used when applying to placement positions. Compare it your CV post-placement and do two things:
1) Identify how you could improve your rejected applications – it’s useful for self-learning and creating a stronger personal profile for yourself.
2) Give yourself a pat on the back for how far you’ve come!

Don’t be afraid to approach people in senior positions. It’s a competitive world and if you eliminate the ‘scary’ aspect of liaising with people senior than you, you’ll find yourself mature in the workplace.

Ask for feedback. If you’ve done work for someone, no matter how big or small, request feedback. Build a portfolio of all the feedback you receive and use it to find trends of what you perform well in and where you could improve. In the graduate working world, feedback helps you build a case to put forward for promotion.

We’re here to help you navigate your next adventure – for up to three years after you graduate! Visit us in the Careers+Placements Centre today to discover how we can support your career search.

I’ve got a job! The learning process of going from student to employee

In the next few months, many university students will be making that important move to the workplace. It can be a daunting first step to take…even for students who may have been working during their time in education, or who may have completed a placement as part of their course. As a student, it can be comforting to know that once the university vacation or placement year has ended, it is possible to leave that temporary job, internship or work placement and head back to the “safety” of a familiar campus environment. For many students however, the upcoming end of university means stepping out of a recognisable environment they have grown accustomed to over a number of years….and with no university to go back to in a few weeks’ time.

Many students have already gone through the lengthy and time consuming steps involved in writing applications and working through challenging recruitment selection processes to secure that first job. It would be easy to think that all the hard work is done, mission accomplished…course completed and job offer in the bag. However making that move from education into the workplace on a full-time basis involves significant change, and can mean much upheaval. The end of university marks the start of a new chapter of learning about how to move from student status to that of an employee/worker/member of staff.

Whether you are going to start on a graduate scheme, an entry level job, or even if you will be working in a role that is not your intended career path and/or still pondering what your next career step will be, you may find the following insights helpful to keep in mind as you move into the world of work:

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1. The learning process starts all over again

You’ve spent 3-4 years at university to get your degree, which marks that valuable first step in your career journey. Your learning won’t end at your graduation ceremony. Now comes the time to really start applying what you’ve learnt to the world of work, whether directly from your degree subject itself, or the wide range of skills that studying a degree has enabled you to build; independence, critical thinking, communication and teamwork, to name a few. This is why employers want graduates to recognise and actively develop themselves whilst at university. You can then start transferring your skills into your daily work when you start a job.

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2. Your mind set in the workplace is important

Whether you find yourself on a graduate scheme that you’ve always wanted, or working in a role as a stepping stone whilst you discover more about what you would like in your career, acting in positive ways and carrying yourself professionally in the workplace is important. Keep in mind that your outlook will be on show, from the way you talk to your colleagues through to your quality of work, and how you tackle even the most simple of tasks. Respecting colleagues, working with enthusiasm, and having a general positive attitude can really make a difference to your experiences and opportunities in the workplace. 

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3. Don’t expect all the exciting work/projects to come to you straight away

This one is very much linked to no. 2 in the list. With any job there is a period of adjustment, settling in and getting to grips with the basics. You may have achieved high academic grades at university, however when you start in any job, you need to prove yourself. Being able to integrate and work with others, carry out tasks to a high quality, and deliver work on time is vital, before progressing onto new and more complex and challenging work. Even if you find yourself working in a job that doesn’t align to your future career desires, still put in the work and effort, you never know how/when this could open up new opportunities or career routes within the organisation, and which you didn’t even know existed.

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4. Employers won’t really “spoon feed” their employees

Sure there is usually a period of training and an induction when you start a new job. Typically there are support mechanisms in place to help you as you navigate your way through your job tasks and duties. Do keep in mind that much of what you learn is done so “on-the-job.” You will learn a lot by trial and error, through trying, reflecting, asking questions, and adapting to improve for next time.

The same can be said for your professional development. You may start on a structured grad scheme but not all training and development opportunities may be handed to you on a plate.  As you find out more about your strengths and interests, learn to reflect and consider the areas where you could, and want to gain more experience, and further develop your skills. Speak with your management about this, it shows initiative, a commitment to your own development, and can only add to your future value in the workplace. Even if you find yourself working in a role that isn’t your ideal graduate career, consider if there are any internal training opportunities that you could take advantage of. This could really add value to your CV, and equip you with new skills for a future workplace.

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5. Work hard but don’t peak too soon

As a new graduate you should be working hard. There may be the temptation to throw yourself into a job so much that you say “yes” to everything that comes your way, but remember that “slow and steady wins the race.” Get to know the organisation you are working for, how it is structured, and speak to and get to know your work colleagues too. Embed and immerse yourself and learn the basics of your job and get that right before raising your hand to take on more complex projects. 

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6. The world of work is massively different to being a student

This may seem like a no-brainer and pretty obvious, but moving from the lifestyle of a student to that of a worker can still be a bit of a culture shock. It took me a good year to get my head round! Where late nights, late starts and missing the odd few lectures may be the norm at university, you will likely find that you have to adjust your daily body clock to accommodate structured working hours, for which you can’t just skip one day, and turn up the next. The culture of the workplace is different to university. From how you are expected to dress, through to telephone and email etiquette. Watch and learn, and give yourself a bit of time to adapt.

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7. There are learning opportunities by working in any type of job

More than ever, due to the changing nature of the workplace, it is highly unlikely that your first job after university will be your last. 

So whatever your first career step after university, even if you are working in a job and you have no idea of where your future lies, know that you are growing, maturing and acquiring valuable abilities, strengths and personal qualities that you will no doubt use at some point as you navigate your way along your career path.

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Aston student to HR Graduate at Wesleyan Assurance Society

Jess Lambie graduated from Aston University in 2016 with a BSc Psychology (Hons) degree. She is now working as an HR Graduate at Wesleyan Assurance Society. We caught up with her to find out more about her life after Aston.

How did you secure your graduate scheme?

I love to learn new things, to analyse patterns and to create – and I am very much a people person. That’s what led me to study Psychology, and then on to a career in Human Resources.

When I saw this graduate scheme advertised at Wesleyan, offering rotation around the various disciplines within HR as well as the chance to complete my CIPD qualification, I knew I couldn’t miss the opportunity! Following a video interview and a full day’s assessment centre, here I am – and I love it!

What does your typical day look like? 

I would say that I’m very lucky in the sense that I don’t really have a typical day! Currently I’m sat within recruitment, so my day can involve advertising jobs, organising interviews and assessment centres, CV sifting and video interviewing. But I also get the opportunity to work on projects that utilise my analysis and creativity skills.

I get exposure to all areas and levels of the business, through Employee Relations cases, interviews, Employee Networks and Reverse Mentoring.

What skills have you developed through the role? 

The amount of project work has been a huge help in pushing and developing my organisation skills and independence. Self-motivation and communication are key to my role, and I’m slowly working on my ability to challenge processes – but I know I have all the support I need to work on my development areas.

What would you say to final year students or other recent graduates considering a graduate scheme?

Graduate schemes are ideal. It’s continuous learning, in all forms; you are supported through a professional qualification that will enhance your knowledge and skill set, but you also get hands-on experience in the role, and exposure to experts in your field.

How has this scheme shaped your future plans? 

I had never been completely sure where I wanted my career to progress. I came into HR by accident, but I soon decided that was the path for me. This graduate scheme has not only confirmed that I made the right decision, but it has also shown me the potential I have to develop in this field. HR is a rapidly developing area, which makes it an exciting and ever-changing role. Thanks to this scheme, I now feel that I have the tools, the support, and the opportunity to gain the necessary experience to progress my career to the HR Business Partner level. There are so many challenges, and I look forward to the next one!

This could be you! If you’re currently searching for your dream graduate role, why not head to Aston Futures to explore the wide range of graduate opportunities advertised there? Don’t forget, you can also come and chat to us in the Careers+Placements Centre if you need some support with your career journey. 

 

My graduate role at JD Sports Fashion plc.

Manreet Atwal graduated from Aston University in 2017 with a BSc Psychology and Business degree. She is now on a Multi-channel Graduate Programme at JD Sports Fashion plc. Here she tells us more about her role and how it’s helping to shape her career journey. 

How did you secure your role?

I used LinkedIn often in my search for graduate roles. I had a rough idea of companies I would like to work for because of my placement search. I followed JD Sports Fashion plc on LinkedIn to see their updates and spot any career opportunities.

I saw an advertisement for their Multi-Channel Graduate Scheme and applied. The application involved uploading a CV and two-minute video describing yourself as creatively as possible. After this, there was an assessment centre. The final stage involved a presentation to the Director of Multi-Channel and a face-to-face interview.

What does your typical day look like?

Over the course of two years, I will move across multiple departments within Multi-Channel. The departments include; Content, Merchandising, CRM, PPC, SEO, Social Media & Marketplaces.

During my placement in each department, my role is to understand the functionality of each team and learn the programmes and processes they use to complete tasks. No day is the same because we have to constantly react to the fast-paced market.

What have you learnt so far?

I’m gaining a really great overview of how an entire department functions. JD Sports is one of the UK’s biggest retailers so the insight I’m gaining is invaluable. I’m learning how teams work within themselves and as part of a wider team, and I am able to provide feedback at the end of each placement of what works and where there may be opportunities.

What advice would you offer to final year students or other recent graduates?

Don’t take the first job you’re offered just because it’s there. Take time to decide; look into the company, look into the role and decide how much experience you want to gain.

It’s okay to have a job before you hand in your dissertation, and it’s okay to be searching for months after you’ve graduated – just find the right match for you. You didn’t study at Aston University for four years to take a job you don’t love!

How has your current role shaped your career plans?

This Graduate Scheme is great because I graduated with the certainty that I wanted a career in Marketing, but I didn’t really know what that meant. This scheme allows me to get stuck into multiple departments and learn my own strengths and weakness. I also get to work in departments I hadn’t considered before such as SEO and various other means of Traffic. JD Sports has also offered me lots of training opportunities, which have helped me grow more confident in my career plans of becoming a high-level manager. 

Looking for your own dream graduate role? Why not head to Aston Futures today to explore the wide range of graduate opportunities advertised there? Don’t forget, you can also come and chat to us in the Careers+Placements Centre if you need some support with your
career journey. 

What’s the big deal with SMEs?

It can sometimes feel difficult trying to find the right placement or graduate role for you. Large companies can offer attractive graduate schemes or placement programmes, but competition for them is often fierce. But don’t despair, there are plenty of opportunities out there – you just need to look in the right places. Don’t make a big mistake and ignore the opportunities offered at small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – just because they aren’t household names, it doesn’t mean they can’t offer you exciting prospects.

What is an SME?

An SME is defined as a company that employs fewer than 250 people. In 2017, 5.7 million SMEs were recorded in the UK, which means there are a lot of options out there! New and upcoming businesses tend to be SMEs and they cover almost all business sectors, so whatever you are interested in, there should be something for you.

Why should I consider an SME?

There are lots of benefits of working at an SME. Here are just a few that you might find rewarding.

Embrace the culture
The culture of SMEs is one of the biggest differences between smaller and larger companies – you will be in a smaller work environment and, therefore, a smaller team. This means you should be able to integrate well into the team and get to grips with the staff and departments more quickly. Not only will this interconnection between the departments make communication more effective, but you will be able to get a better understanding of your role and feel more comfortable in it much more quickly.

Make an impact
Linking to the close-knit community at SMEs, working within a smaller company means you are more likely to get your hard work noticed. It will also be easier to have your voice heard – you could potentially be working with more senior members of staff in smaller companies which is a great opportunity to share your ideas and make a difference! This will give you job satisfaction – watching your ideas being implemented and being able to oversee projects through from start to finish will help you feel like you are making a real contribution to the business.

Broaden your skill-set
Due to the smaller team size, you are less likely to be restricted to a single role – you will probably have varied responsibilities, maybe even across different departments. For example, if you worked in a marketing role, you could find yourself carrying out work in digital, print, advertising, sales or event workstreams. Not only does this mean you get to pick up transferable skills, but being exposed to different workstreams will help you gain a better understanding of how the company works and which area you may want to specialise in.

Where could I be working?

There are SMEs in all types of sectors, but here are some of the most common areas that you may consider when looking for opportunities:

  • Arts and culture
  • Marketing, media and publishing
  • Manufacturing
  • Financial services
  • Legal services
  • Consultancies
  • Technology/software companies
  • Construction
  • Charities

How do I find opportunities at SMEs?

Finding opportunities at SMEs can sometimes be a bit trickier than finding them at larger companies, as they aren’t often marketed in the same way. Here are some tips to remember during your search.

  • SMEs often rely on recruitment agencies to fill their roles, so it may be worth looking at this route.
  • When searching for roles online, don’t focus on brand identity. This means, instead of searching for companies you know about, focus on searching for specific roles or industries e.g. search for ‘auditing roles in Birmingham’ rather than ‘Deloitte vacancies’. The trick is to use buzzwords – such as sectors and role types – rather than company names.
  • Larger companies often recruit far in advance for their graduate schemes and placement programmes. SMEs don’t – they usually recruit as and when they need to. They often advertise for roles in the Spring, which is ideal if you missed out on some of the early deadlines before Christmas!
  • Don’t dismiss internships – if you are looking for a graduate role, you may only be interested in securing a full-time, permanent position. However, some SMEs may offer internships with the potential for you to be kept on as a permanent member of staff if you impress as an intern. Make sure to read all the details when you see internship opportunities advertised or contact the employer to see if there is a possibility of you being considered for a permanent role at the end of the internship.
  • It’s also a good idea to apply speculatively to SMEs if they aren’t currently advertising specific roles, as they may invite you in for a chat or keep your CV on file for when a role does come up. However, it’s important that you outline your expectations in these speculative applications – say you are looking for paid placement opportunities for example. Don’t say you are willing to work for free, as some companies may exploit that.

Things to remember when searching for opportunities

While we do want you to take SMEs into consideration when searching for opportunities, make sure you take some time to think properly about whether an SME is the right company for you.

  • Think about whether you are happy having a varied role in a small team, or if you would prefer to have a more defined role within a larger team. It can be hard work having to juggle a variety of responsibilities, so think about what kind of work you would be happy with. 
  • How much training do you want? A graduate role at an SME for example won’t be structured in the same way as a larger graduate scheme – it will usually be an entry level role. Additionally, SMEs often focus on on-the-job learning as they often have fewer resources for training compared to larger companies.
  • Do background research about the company before applying – find out what type of work they do, what the work culture is like, what their values are etc. to see if it’s a company you would feel happy working for.
  • There is sometimes the option to negotiate your start date at an SME which you might not be able to do for larger companies. Therefore, if there is a role being advertised with a starting date that is before the end of your exams/you graduate, you may be able to speak to the employer to see if there is any flexibility with the start date.

If you want to find out more about the big opportunities an SME could offer you, we are here to help! Visit our dedicated webpage: www.aston.ac.uk/sme, join in the conversation on social media using the hashtag #AstonSMEs or come and speak to us in the Careers+Placements Centre. Don’t forget, you can also explore a range of placement and graduate opportunities at SMEs on Aston Futures.

Why you should consider working at a start-up

Stuart Harrison graduated from Aston University in 2014 with a degree in International Business with Modern Languages (French). He is now Co-Founder of a start-up called Remedy Roots (who are nourishing better health through a range of signature loose leaf tea blends) based in Birmingham. Here he tells us about his career journey, what it’s like working in a start-up and how his placement year helped him to get where he is today.

Tell us a bit about your career journey. How have you moved from being an Aston student to where you are now?

After graduating, I moved down to Reading to work for a B2B marketing agency. I started off in their client services team – helping clients and managing projects for them. I then worked my way over to the planning department, where we would plan marketing strategies and campaigns for our primarily tech-focused clients. During that time, I studied for a Postgraduate Diploma in Digital Marketing with the IDM.

After two years, I decided to move back to Birmingham to live with my girlfriend (a fellow Aston student I met on placement year!). I was briefly the head of marketing for a small tech company, which sadly went bust after four months due to some lingering issues from before I joined.

That left me with a choice – to get another job, or work for myself. I decided to start working as a freelance marketing consultant. Soon after, my cousin approached me with an idea for her own range of health-beneficial herbal teas.

You are Co-Founder of Remedy Roots – how did that come about? Did your degree support you with the work that involved?

My cousin originally asked me for a marketing plan for her new business. After looking at what she wanted to achieve, and the values she would have along the way, I fell in love with the idea. I asked her if she would consider a 50/50 business partner, and she said yes!

My degree formed a solid base of knowledge that I could use to guide us in taking the first steps to creating a business.

What does your work involve? Do you have any highlights you’d like to share?

As a start-up founder, there is no task or job that you can consider as ‘not for you’; you very much become a jack of all trades. As a digital marketer, it’s been really interesting to learn how to sell at events and fairs, which has taught me a lot about the thinking process people actually go through when buying. We’re quite proud of ourselves that we’ve gone through all the steps needed to start getting our products stocked in shops and cafes, which has been a steep learning curve.

Before you graduated from Aston, what was your opinion of working at an SME or start-up? Has this changed?

I’ve always wanted my own business – the degree I chose and the jobs I took after were deliberate, to try and prepare myself for when the right idea came along. The all-consuming nature of a start-up is definitely much clearer to me now, but I’m still really happy to be working for myself!

What do you think are the greatest benefits of working at an SME/start-up?

If you’re working for a start-up, you’ve got a voice that will be heard. There’s no getting lost in the mix and if you’ve got an idea, you can test it out without having to go through three months of getting the right department members on-board. On top of that, if you’re with the right company then there will always be room for progression, because you’re helping the business to expand into bigger and better things.

What advice would you give to other students looking for job at an SME/start-up or considering starting up their own business?

Find something that you love. Whether it’s your idea or someone else’s, if you’re getting involved at a small business level, there’s no room for coasters – you need to really believe in what you’re promoting. At the same time, make sure you’re going into business with someone that’s interested in seeing you profit as well as themselves.

Did you do a placement whilst you were at Aston? If so, where was it and what did it involve? Did it help shape your career path in any way?

Yes! The placement year sealed the deal when I was looking at University courses. I did six months in Nice, France working for a boat rental company, then six months in Paris for Orange Business Services. A placement is invaluable. I found that at all my subsequent job interviews, I spent more time talking about my experiences on the placement year than anything else. It completely broadens your thinking and helps you to appreciate what the working world looks like beyond the part-time jobs that are available to a student.

You can find out more about Remedy Roots here: remedyroots.com

If Stuart’s story has inspired you to find out how small companies can offer you big opportunities, we are here to help! Visit our dedicated webpage: www.aston.ac.uk/sme, join in the conversation on social media using the hashtag #AstonSMEs or come and speak to us in the Careers+Placements Centre. Don’t forget, you can also explore a range of placement and graduate opportunities at SMEs on Aston Futures.

 

Job Search Advice: Don’t get catfished…

Applying for a job is a necessity whether it’s for a part-time job , a placement year or your graduate job search, searching through hundreds of jobs can seem like a bit of a chore. We often see stories in the news of graduates who go more than the extra mile to get noticed e.g. the unemployed graduate who spent his last £500 on an advertising billboard. Online scammers are taking advantage of desparate graduates who are searching for their perfect job, so here are some top tips on how to stay safe in your job search…

1. Don’t give out any sensitive personal information

Justin Bieber Password

Most of us have some sort of online profile, so don’t complete the puzzle by giving out any other information! There is absolutely no reason why a recruiter or employer would require your bank details, NI number or mother’s maiden name at application stage. Get in touch with Careers+Placements if you have any concerns.

2. Definitely be suspicious towards anything concerning you giving money to an employer

Give me all your money job scam

You shouldn’t ever have to pay an employer or agency money in return for a guaranteed job, or even help with your job search. We have had students in the past lose £££’s to get a job abroad disguised as ‘processing’ or ‘visa fees’. There are some legitimate companies who have fees, but contact Careers+Placements to check before you hand over any money!

3. Little or no experience required? It is too good to be true I’m afraid!

When you lie on your CV and still get the job

An ‘employer’ has found your CV online and is offering you a role as a Trainee Business Executive, with all training provided for £45k a year and they say the job is yours if you want it. Genuine graduate job adverts will at least have a brief description of duties and a person specification in regards to your qualification and experience- have a look on Aston Futures and see for yourself!

4. The ‘we found your CV online’ scam

who are you and how did you find me

Online scammers are evolving, using lists of email addresses found anywhere online. Whether you are applying for jobs or not, you can receive emails claiming to have seen your CV online. Often the email address will not be legitimate e.g. Aston University’s email addresses follow the format @aston.ac.uk but if you receive an email from @aston.com/aston.ac.uk@ahx.com you can identify this as a fraud email. Also be aware of any telephone numbers or websites which don’t follow the company’s usual format.

5. The ‘ I turned my £5 into £500 in one hour’ scam

I'm serious

Hook. Line. Sinker. I know we all believe we’re too smart to fall for this one, but many of us already have! ‘Companies’ can publish testimonials to look as if they are coming from a genuine person who even has a LinkedIn profile, but these scammers invest time into building an online presence as a marketing ploy to get you to fill in any kind of personal details. Even if you don’t go ahead and apply, having your email address on file may be enough for them to sell onto another scammer who may try a different tactic a few months down the line.

6. Don’t get catfished…Use Google

Don't get catfished

Any time I have been unsure about a legitimate company, I tend to write their name into Google followed by ‘scam’ or the first line of their email, or the email address it’s coming from. There are several websites you can use to check the legitimacy of a company e.g. Companies House and Company Check. You can always contact Careers+Placements to investigate for you.

Follow these simple steps and stay safe when applying for jobs!

Guilty face

Aston University Careers+Placements
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W: www.aston.ac.uk/careers
E: careers@aston.ac.uk

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Hayley

Written by Hayley, Student Engagement Coordinator Aston University Careers+Placements