Author Archives: Harjap

Working abroad can change your life (+placement opportunity!)

Ana Carrasco, a former Aston Student and Head of Customer Services at Seville’s new business centre, ‘iSspaces’ talks us through the following:

  • An opportunity for you to undertake a 4-6 month placement at iSspaces
  • The benefits of working abroad
  • How the Spanish city of Seville could be the perfect destination for your placement.

An opportunity for you

iSspaces is a beautiful new business centre based out of Seville which, aside from renting office space to growing businesses and entrepreneurs, has created and fostered a community of like-minded business people through its events and hospitality.

The obvious benefit for these business owners, aside from a state-of-the-art office space, is that they have endless opportunities to network, all of them working in and sharing the same building.

iSspaces regularly hold events and functions for some of the most famous brands across Seville and Spain; a case in point being a Google for Education event only weeks ago, which brought together teachers from across Andalusia for talks with Google employees about advancing classroom technology.

Students are invited to apply for the placement position of Customer Service Assistant Manager at iSspaces. If you’re a multi-talented individual who understands good design, can negotiate with providers, enjoys events, has an excellent eye for detail, and can deal with people in both English and Spanish, this could be the opportunity for you.

Full details of this placement role are on Aston Futures, REF 762X or you can view it here. You can also contact Ana Indi Amona from the International Placements Team at a.indi-amona@aston.ac.uk

Find out more about iSspaces here.

 

 The benefits of working abroad

Choosing to work in a different country gives you the opportunity to improve your language skills.

My arrival at Aston University was both exciting and worrisome. I remember I had to communicate using hand gestures, and it was difficult to follow conversations.

Luckily, I was at the most open-minded, internationally-friendly university ever, and I quickly found that people were willing to spend plenty of time and effort helping me to improve, both academically and personally.

I have to thank Aston University for helping me reach my goal of being bilingual, for professional advancement, and for being aware that a multicultural environment is the key to success.

It goes without saying that learning English has had an amazing impact on my life. It opened up many new opportunities for interaction with people I wouldn’t have otherwise spoken to.

The people I met at Aston have stayed with me throughout my life, both personally and professionally. I was lucky enough to meet my partner at Aston and we now have a bilingual son, and I have also done business with those contacts I made back in Birmingham.

My life has been enriched by my stay abroad, in ways I couldn’t possibly have imagined before the experience.

Seville as a placement destination

Seville is home to some of the most beautiful architecture in the world, significantly influenced by three North-African dynasties from the 8th to the 13th centuries. It’s a city rich in culture, with lots of fantastic events throughout the year.

It’s not hard to remember to enjoy yourself in Seville, we expect to work hard and play hard. Los Sevillanos here in the south are fiercely proud of their city and their reputation as the social elite of Spain.

The gastronomy and entertainment is second to none, with a booming nightlife and social scene be it indoors or out, as you can make the most of the late daylight hours and warm nights.

Couple this with the fact that the south is significantly cheaper than the north, and Spain cheaper than other European destinations, you’ll quickly find that your Erasmus grants stretch a long way.

How I started a business during my placement year

Ashleigh Plummer, who is an Aston graduate, started a business in his placement year with the support of BSEEN. Ashleigh shares his story below. 

What did you do for your placement year?

For my placement year I started a company called Deusoft Web Development and Creative Studio. This is basically a creative web company that aimed to help small-to-medium-sized businesses showcase their brands in the best possible light. As we worked with multiple clients, the specifications were always different. Our job was to listen to our clients’ needs, break it down and then use an agile process to produce something that our clients were proud of.

How did BSEEN support you?

BSEEN helped by providing an office space at the innovation campus in Birmingham which gave us the professional outlook we needed, especially when meeting with clients. BSEEN also provided a grant which enabled me to purchase business equipment and software. They also provided a mentor who was able to clear some of my thoughts about the direction I was taking the business.

Tell us a bit about the process for applying to the BSEEN programme and the support offered during the year.

The process is very simple. At the end of the day, BSEEN are there to help you start and run a successful business. The process consists of filling in an application form and a panel interview to which you provide a presentation on your business idea.

Once you are accepted onto the programme, you have to attend a business boot camp which provides you with essential foundation knowledge of running a business i.e. Finance, Marketing, Sales, etc.

Over the year, BSEEN organise and advise you on a ton of different events that would be beneficial for your business. These events are great for meeting potential clients and creating new acquaintances.

Can you tell us a bit more about the business you ran?

The company was a web and mobile development studio based in Birmingham, which also offered additional services such as branding, social media marketing and SEO.

Main services included:
• Web development (HTML, PHP, JavaScript and CSS)
• Mobile App development (Android/Java, iOS)
• Branding (logo design, business cards and social media branding)
• Digital Marketing (SEO and social media marketing)

Deusoft was set up in the aim of bringing web solutions to small businesses and start-ups within the West Midlands.

Would you recommend the BSEEN programme to current 2nd year students?

I would, however, it is not your traditional placement scheme. You must have a lot of self-discipline and be a pro-active thinker. No one is going to tell you what to do: you must decide it all by yourself. So if you have a business idea that you are passionate about and you have a long term vision for it, then the programme is for you.

 

What was the highlight of your placement? Receiving my first payment for my creative skills.

What advice would you give those considering starting up their own business?

You need to know how to communicate what your business is as simply as possible. If your customers don’t understand what you’re selling, then they won’t buy from you. The way people see, hear and recognise your business is crucial. Know your audience, know your business.

Did Ashleigh’s story inspire you to start your own business during your placement year? Why not come and speak to BSEEN about the support they can offer you at our upcoming #FindYourPlacement event, which is taking place on 11th June? Spaces are limited, so book your place now!

My placement year at Shoosmiths

Aadil Qureshi is currently a final year student studying LL.B. Law. He completed his placement year at Shoosmiths last year as an Administration Assistant. Aadil shares his placement experience below. 

Sum up your placement experience in 3 words:

Insightful, fun, life-changing.

How did you secure your placement?

I managed to secure my placement by making sure, before everything, that I had a CV worth a second look. In the current market it’s imperative to have so much more than just academic achievements on your CV and my advice to those in years below me has always been to get stuck in with every opportunity that comes your way: you never know which may be the one that helps you stand out. In terms of this placement specifically, I had to complete a short phone interview and then a face-to-face interview which lasted about an hour.

What was your typical day?

My typical day would involve getting into work for 9am, and then commencing work on my to-do list for the day. As a case handler, my usual duties involved contacting customers of our clients who were in debt to the client and request payment of that debt. Should a customer refuse to pay or was unable to pay, it was my job to issue legal proceedings against them. This could involve anything from requesting a County Court Judgment against them to placing a Charging Order on their house or requesting a bailiff visit. Other than this, I also liaised with Courts and Counsel. As the Complaint Specialist, I also dealt with complaints made against us pursuant to FCA regulations.

What skills did you develop during your placement?

I developed various skills during my placement, predominantly case and time management. Effective case and time management was an integral part of my role and this has allowed me to obtain and develop skills which will, in turn, assist me in a career in a fast-paced environment. I also developed an advanced level of communication skills because I would be communicating with people of different levels of intelligence on a daily basis. This means I had to adapt how I communicated depending on whom I was speaking to.

What was your favourite placement moment?

I think my favourite placement moment was the Christmas Party at Shoosmiths. This was full-fledged, no-expense-spared extravaganza. It had the whole Great Gatsby grand party vibes about it. The party took place at the Northampton county cricket stadium and had a guest list of approx. 500 employees. The theme of the night was Bollywood and it was amazing to see everyone have such a great time, even certain managing partners who you see on a daily basis in a professional environment just forget everything and have a good time. The party went on into the early hours of the morning!

What would you say to students considering a placement?

I’d say do it! Whether you love it or not you will not regret it. The placement will either show you if the career you have picked for yourself or the type of work you will be doing is exactly right for you in which case, great. Or, it will show you that you don’t actually want that career or type of job in which case great too, because it is better to know before you have invested years and money into it just to find it isn’t for you. And apart from this, the generic skills you will obtain and develop will help you in all walks of life.

How has your placement affected your final year and future career plans?

It has definitely helped me have a more mature mindset in my final year. This in turn I think has helped me significantly with my modules and just in general understanding of the content. I think the maturity I have gained is also evident to my lecturers and I hope this will also be apparent to any prospective employers. With regards to career plans, for me, my placement showed me a legal career is exactly what I want and has motivated me to push further and ensure I reach the professional milestones I have set for myself.

‘What are you going to do for placement next year?’ ‘ummmmm…’

How you choose to spend a placement year can give rise to weeks of deliberation. Do you work or study? Do you stay in the UK or go abroad? If you work then what company do you work in? What aspect of business do you focus on?

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As a professional in indecisiveness, I remember this struggle well, and as I enter the last quarter of my internship I thought it may be useful to share the three main reasons why I believe if you are considering a year in industry then you should go for it.

 

Basic work experience is crucial

For many of us, we start University with no previous work experience within a business. I had always wondered what people do when they spend 8 hours a day looking at computer screens. What are they doing for that long? What actually happens within a business?

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The basic understanding of office functions is extremely valuable, and it has been really interesting and insightful to have a taste of the 9-5 office life.
This experience is just as crucial to employers as it is to the interns. Workplace experience can help graduates stand out from the crowd, as not all students can graduate with a years’ experience of working under their belt. In fact, last year, 59% of graduate hires for the Top Undergraduate Employers comprised of previous placement students and interns.

Clearer idea of your potential career

Work placements are a good way of ensuring you will not end up on a graduate scheme doing something you don’t like.
You will either enjoy your role or realise it is not the role for you. Either way, you learn what you do and don’t enjoy, which is important as you never really know what area you want to specialise in if you haven’t tried it out.

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I went into my placement at IBM with the idea of gaining a marketing role as I thought that was what I wanted to specialise in after University. However, I have learned over these months that design and innovation is what really motivates and interests me, so I can now tailor my graduate job searching with this in mind. Without taking a year in industry I may never have known how much I really am inspired by innovation.

Embarking on a year in industry provides you with an opportunity to explore other aspects of the business, aside from your role, to see what areas are your strengths and weaknesses. I have taken part in a variety of intern competitions and shadowing at IBM to try out as many aspects of corporation as possible, and the experience and insights I have gained will massively impact my career choice.

Fun!

I was worried when selecting a work placement over a study abroad placement that it wouldn’t be as much fun because I would be missing the ‘Uni lifestyle’. I couldn’t have been more wrong.

 

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For most internships, you move to a new city and often flat share with fellow interns so there is still the opportunity to live with people of your age or make new friends in the area.

Aside from this, you are learning every day in a corporate environment that is new to you. It is hard to not have fun in an environment where you are learning new things each day and still have the opportunity to spend your evenings how you choose – exploring a city, spending time with your friends, meeting new people. I currently live with three IBM interns and the balance of a professional environment on weekdays and exploring London together on weekends is really fulfilling. It is also reassuring to know that in this life scenario, you are surrounded by people, particularly the interns, who are in the same boat as you, with the same academic and career interests, so no matter how different you think you may be, you will always find things in common.

 

I would never have gained the friends, knowledge and experience this year had I not have taken a work placement. All in all, it’s been a great experience and one which I know will benefit me throughout my career. My advice? Go for it!

 

On placement at YouthSight

Studying Psychology here at Aston, Sophie Derham is currently on placement as a Research Assistant at YouthSight in Shoreditch, London. Find out more about what she’s been getting up to…

What skills have you developed during your placement?

I have developed project management skills mainly, as I have created and adhered to timelines for lots of different projects, which also means that my time management skills have improved. I have also gained communication skills as a key part of my job is to talk with a range of different people: fellow colleagues, clients and participants in research.

What has been the highlight of your placement so far?

So far, I have been on placement for seven months. The highlight for me has been sitting on a panel at an event and speaking about what it is like to be a young person. Other highlights include attending conferences and speaking to potential clients. I enjoy this side of the job the most.

How did you secure your placement? 

I found the position on Aston Futures. I applied by sending my CV and a short cover letter to the Managing Director of the company, Ben Marks. He then invited me for an interview, and I was offered the job a couple of weeks later! The Careers+Placements team helped me with practice interview questions and sent me some tips on how to structure my answers and make me stand out from other candidates.

Has doing a placement helped or changed your plans for the future?

Being on a placement year is a great experience and has really helped me think about what I want to do in the future. Prior to starting my placement, I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do as a career. I was not looking for a placement in any particular sector as I wanted to keep my options open and hopefully find something that really appealed to me.

I do think I would like to stay in the market research sector as I believe I’m quite talented at my job! I want to develop my skills and hopefully I can become a successful market researcher after graduating.

What advice would you give to other students thinking about doing a placement?

If you are planning on doing a placement, I would advise you to start applying as early as you can – at the beginning of second year or even earlier! Placements and internships are a great way to gain experience that will be vital for applying for graduate jobs. A placement is also great as it can help you decide what you would like to do (or definitely not do) after you graduate!

What tips would you give to other students to help them make the most out of their placement?

When on placement, it is important to enjoy yourself and make sure that you take every opportunity that you see. If there are opportunities for extra training, or even just to learn a new skill by completing a task, do it.

Has Sophie’s experience inspired you to undertake a placement? Find out more about placements, visit Aston Futures to search available opportunities or chat to us about your options. 

3 ways to effectively manage your time during placement

Being on placement doesn’t mean that you will be given interesting projects all the time. There is an element of mandate stuff that you will have to do as part of your job scope. Over time, this can get boring and sometimes you will fall into the zone of time wasting activities or even spending too much time reacting to last minute stuff. Here is my secret to how I manage my time as a placement student to be always on the ball and keep things interesting.

Identify what are activities, results or achievements

There is an infinite number of tasks waiting to be done, but what makes a difference in your placement would be how you categorise these kinds of tasks. I have learnt this on a course I attended during my placement which I thought was very useful and I am currently still doing it.

  1. Activities: These are stuff that is like second nature to you. The outcomes are usually within our control. (eg. Sending regular email updates)
  2. Results: These are stuff that doesn’t have an outcome you can control. Success is never guaranteed in these tasks. (eg. Presenting a new system which has been approved by the senior management)
  3. Achievements:  These are the stuff that you want people to remember you for. It is the legacy that you would be leaving in the company and in the minds of your colleagues.

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Managing the inner chimp

Have you ever told yourself that you would start a gym regime but didn’t got around to do it? Or have you ever told yourself that you would focus on getting the assignment done but didn’t get past the introduction?

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 These are signs of your inner chimp at work. All of us has the inner chimp and in order to be productive in our daily life, we have to be able to manage and tame it. The inner chimp is the emotional voice inside of you always telling you to talk the easiest way out or just stay within your comfort zone.

One way that I found useful to manage my inner chimp, is to break my task into smaller 30-minute chunks. By doing so, I find myself being able to focus during those 30 minutes slots without the urge to digress to other task or even feel the need to procrastinate. I usually find myself feeling achieved at the end of the day as I managed to complete my task. Here is an example of how I break down my task.

  • Market Research (1/4): 9am -9.30am
  • Detailed Analysis (2/4): 11am-11:30am
  • Report Compiling (3/4): 2pm – 2.30pm
  • Format Checking (4/4): 4pm – 4.30pm

If you interested in inner chimp concept, you should read The Chimp Paradox by Steve Peters! Great book!

Self-Empowerment

For those who have never held a proper full-time job in their lives would be shocked at how much energy is drained from them at the end of the working day. This can take a while to adapt however over time it may become boring and demoralising at times. Hence, it is crucial to be able to self-motivate and empower yourself to keep your energy going!

What I found useful to have is a task checklist. Firstly, give yourself 3 task that you would like to achieve by the end of the week. Each of these tasks should be easily completed within an hour. Next, you should also have a daily task checklist which compromises of 3 tasks that require less than 30 minutes of work each. These should be easily complete before lunch or by the end of the working day! Here is an example of my weekly and daily task list.

  • Weekly Task List (30 minutes – 1 hour)
  1. Calling up supplier X to discuss a potential partnership.
  2. Compiling Excel Spreadsheet to calculate revenue trend.
  3. Researching on potential new features.
  • Daily Task List (less than 30 minutes)
  1. Clearing my emails from yesterday.
  2. Checking if the product X content is up to date.
  3. Printing outstanding contract to be filed.

As small as it may sound, these daily and weekly tasks are my motivation drivers that replenish my work energy and keeps me on task.

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My placement year at SAP

Stephanie Ponton is currently a final year student studying LL.B. Law. She completed her placement year at SAP UK last year as an In-house legal intern.  Stephanie shares her placement experience below. 

Sum up your placement experience in 3 words:

Incredible, inspiring, challenging.

How did you secure your placement?

I secured my placement by applying through the SAP application process. This involved an online application, a telephone interview and an assessment centre.

What was your typical day?

I would usually start my day around 9am, by checking my emails and prioritising the tasks that I would need to complete that day. I would then begin working through these tasks, starting with those which were most urgent.

My typical day would involve drafting and negotiating non-disclosure agreements, this would often involve conversing with customers via email or over the phone. Moreover, I would review services contracts which involved liaising with different colleagues across the business both face to face and over the phone. I would also review procurement contracts, often working with marketing and procurement teams based in different locations across the world.

Most days would often involve attending team meetings as well as meetings in relation to various projects that I would be working on.

Lunch would be spent with the team in the canteen giving everybody a chance to relax and providing the opportunity to catch up with the other interns.

My day would finish at different times each day, depending on my work load. At the end of the quarter, I would be involved in many important deals which meant I would be staying late at the office to support my team and sales colleagues. However, team morale would always be high creating a pleasant environment!

What skills did you develop from your placement?

My confidence increased significantly during my placement year which also developed my communication skills. Moreover, I learnt how to work under pressure and the importance of prioritisation and how to effectively manage my time.

My placement year also helped to develop my social skills which were important for building a rapport with my team and colleagues across the business.

What was your favourite placement moment?

My favourite placement moment was when I realised how much I had learnt and how far I had come since the beginning of my placement. I remember being sat at my desk working through my tasks and being confident in the work that I was producing. It was then that I realised how much I had learnt and how valuable my placement had been.

What would you say to students considering a placement?

Placement year is an extremely valuable experience. No matter where you secure your placement, the skills that you learn will be transferable to most roles. Having placement experience makes you stand out when applying for graduate schemes and provides a great opportunity to experience the working world and work out what path you want to take in the future.

How has this affected your final year and future career plans?

Coming back to final year after my placement has completely changed my attitude to work. I am a lot more motivated and disciplined and I am finding it easier to start my days earlier and feel productive throughout the day.

During my placement year, I also managed to secure a training contract. Although not at the place I completed my placement year, I am certain the skills and experience that I gained from SAP contributed to me securing my training contract.

My placement year greatly affirmed my ambition and motivation to become a lawyer and has increased my desire to be successful.

 

From placement student at Nestlé to graduate at Capgemini

Sandy Nijjar graduated from Aston in 2015 with a BSc Computing for Business degree. She completed her placement year at Nestlé and now works as a Business Transformation Consultant at Capgemini.

What were your key highlights/projects/achievements on placement?

My key achievement was being given the sole responsibility to manage the field sales solution for six months and supporting over 700 field sales users and the field sales capture tool Visicom. I had worked closely with the market contact within Germany, Nestlé retail operations team and other international support teams.

How did you go about finding your placement?

I used Aston Futures and looked on company websites for placement roles.

How has Aston University helped you prepare for graduate employment?

The Careers+Placements team at Aston University held a number of sessions with companies that equipped me with skills that I could use for my graduate employment.

How did you secure your graduate role?

I applied to a number of different graduate schemes earlier in my final year and juggled my coursework deadlines and exam prep.

My best careers advice to another student would be…

Make the most of all the opportunities available at Aston University. Attend career sessions and network with employers during these events. I would also recommend to apply to graduate roles early in your final year.

We’re here to help you navigate your next adventure – for up to three years after you graduate! Visit us in the Careers+Placements Centre today to discover how we can support your career search.

My career journey so far…

Maya Modi graduated from Aston University in 2016 with a degree in BSc English Language. She is now working as a Consultant at Capgemini. Here she tells us about her career journey so far. 

Where did you undertake your placement?

I split my placement year up into three parts: a semester studying abroad, a semester working in the UK and a summer studying abroad. The studying elements were obtained via Aston and I located the working placement myself.

For the first semester of my placement year, I was an ERASMUS student at Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain. I then came home and spent the second semester picking up my former role within my local Accident & Emergency department. Finally, I spent the summer studying Chinese Sociopolitics at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

What were your key highlights/projects/achievements on placement?

Given the placements I was doing, it was difficult to be involved in high profile projects as such, but that didn’t stop me from getting involved with high profile individuals. The lecturers I worked with hailed from renowned universities such as Yale, Harvard and Princeton, so the pressure was on to impress them! My lecturers praised my work, which was a great feeling considering the subjects I was studying were alien to me. I’m also not fluent in Spanish or Cantonese, so adjusting to lecture content was difficult, but I got through it.

How did you go about finding your placement?

I checked Aston Futures religiously for the opening of study abroad applications, as I knew that was what I wanted to do. I mostly liaised with the Careers+Placements team as my main source of finding and securing placements.

How has Aston University helped you prepare for graduate employment?

I think the amount of careers fairs that are open to us are fantastic. I attended most of them, even the ones irrelevant to me. You can practise how to approach recruiters and learn to ask the right questions. I also really liked that Careers+Placements can arrange mock interviews for you and do CV checks.

How did you secure your graduate role?

I attended careers fairs out of my comfort zone to expand the industries I could fit into post-graduation. ‘High Tea Meets IT’ was a careers fair targeted at females wanting to go into the technology industry and we all had high tea together. This was where I met my current employer and from then on, I applied to their graduate scheme via their website.

My best careers advice to another student would be…

I started my LinkedIn page before university. The earlier you start it, the sooner you’ll learn to use it properly. I’d already made a fair few contacts, including graduate recruiters, but as soon as I’d updated my profile to show a placement year my connection requests went crazy!

Your placement year is the thing that’ll differentiate you from the next candidate. Don’t be afraid to mention that you embarked on a placement year!

Keep all of the applications you got rejected from and the CV/cover letters you used when applying to placement positions. Compare it your CV post-placement and do two things:
1) Identify how you could improve your rejected applications – it’s useful for self-learning and creating a stronger personal profile for yourself.
2) Give yourself a pat on the back for how far you’ve come!

Don’t be afraid to approach people in senior positions. It’s a competitive world and if you eliminate the ‘scary’ aspect of liaising with people senior than you, you’ll find yourself mature in the workplace.

Ask for feedback. If you’ve done work for someone, no matter how big or small, request feedback. Build a portfolio of all the feedback you receive and use it to find trends of what you perform well in and where you could improve. In the graduate working world, feedback helps you build a case to put forward for promotion.

We’re here to help you navigate your next adventure – for up to three years after you graduate! Visit us in the Careers+Placements Centre today to discover how we can support your career search.

I’ve got a job! The learning process of going from student to employee

In the next few months, many university students will be making that important move to the workplace. It can be a daunting first step to take…even for students who may have been working during their time in education, or who may have completed a placement as part of their course. As a student, it can be comforting to know that once the university vacation or placement year has ended, it is possible to leave that temporary job, internship or work placement and head back to the “safety” of a familiar campus environment. For many students however, the upcoming end of university means stepping out of a recognisable environment they have grown accustomed to over a number of years….and with no university to go back to in a few weeks’ time.

Many students have already gone through the lengthy and time consuming steps involved in writing applications and working through challenging recruitment selection processes to secure that first job. It would be easy to think that all the hard work is done, mission accomplished…course completed and job offer in the bag. However making that move from education into the workplace on a full-time basis involves significant change, and can mean much upheaval. The end of university marks the start of a new chapter of learning about how to move from student status to that of an employee/worker/member of staff.

Whether you are going to start on a graduate scheme, an entry level job, or even if you will be working in a role that is not your intended career path and/or still pondering what your next career step will be, you may find the following insights helpful to keep in mind as you move into the world of work:

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1. The learning process starts all over again

You’ve spent 3-4 years at university to get your degree, which marks that valuable first step in your career journey. Your learning won’t end at your graduation ceremony. Now comes the time to really start applying what you’ve learnt to the world of work, whether directly from your degree subject itself, or the wide range of skills that studying a degree has enabled you to build; independence, critical thinking, communication and teamwork, to name a few. This is why employers want graduates to recognise and actively develop themselves whilst at university. You can then start transferring your skills into your daily work when you start a job.

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2. Your mind set in the workplace is important

Whether you find yourself on a graduate scheme that you’ve always wanted, or working in a role as a stepping stone whilst you discover more about what you would like in your career, acting in positive ways and carrying yourself professionally in the workplace is important. Keep in mind that your outlook will be on show, from the way you talk to your colleagues through to your quality of work, and how you tackle even the most simple of tasks. Respecting colleagues, working with enthusiasm, and having a general positive attitude can really make a difference to your experiences and opportunities in the workplace. 

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3. Don’t expect all the exciting work/projects to come to you straight away

This one is very much linked to no. 2 in the list. With any job there is a period of adjustment, settling in and getting to grips with the basics. You may have achieved high academic grades at university, however when you start in any job, you need to prove yourself. Being able to integrate and work with others, carry out tasks to a high quality, and deliver work on time is vital, before progressing onto new and more complex and challenging work. Even if you find yourself working in a job that doesn’t align to your future career desires, still put in the work and effort, you never know how/when this could open up new opportunities or career routes within the organisation, and which you didn’t even know existed.

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4. Employers won’t really “spoon feed” their employees

Sure there is usually a period of training and an induction when you start a new job. Typically there are support mechanisms in place to help you as you navigate your way through your job tasks and duties. Do keep in mind that much of what you learn is done so “on-the-job.” You will learn a lot by trial and error, through trying, reflecting, asking questions, and adapting to improve for next time.

The same can be said for your professional development. You may start on a structured grad scheme but not all training and development opportunities may be handed to you on a plate.  As you find out more about your strengths and interests, learn to reflect and consider the areas where you could, and want to gain more experience, and further develop your skills. Speak with your management about this, it shows initiative, a commitment to your own development, and can only add to your future value in the workplace. Even if you find yourself working in a role that isn’t your ideal graduate career, consider if there are any internal training opportunities that you could take advantage of. This could really add value to your CV, and equip you with new skills for a future workplace.

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5. Work hard but don’t peak too soon

As a new graduate you should be working hard. There may be the temptation to throw yourself into a job so much that you say “yes” to everything that comes your way, but remember that “slow and steady wins the race.” Get to know the organisation you are working for, how it is structured, and speak to and get to know your work colleagues too. Embed and immerse yourself and learn the basics of your job and get that right before raising your hand to take on more complex projects. 

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6. The world of work is massively different to being a student

This may seem like a no-brainer and pretty obvious, but moving from the lifestyle of a student to that of a worker can still be a bit of a culture shock. It took me a good year to get my head round! Where late nights, late starts and missing the odd few lectures may be the norm at university, you will likely find that you have to adjust your daily body clock to accommodate structured working hours, for which you can’t just skip one day, and turn up the next. The culture of the workplace is different to university. From how you are expected to dress, through to telephone and email etiquette. Watch and learn, and give yourself a bit of time to adapt.

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7. There are learning opportunities by working in any type of job

More than ever, due to the changing nature of the workplace, it is highly unlikely that your first job after university will be your last. 

So whatever your first career step after university, even if you are working in a job and you have no idea of where your future lies, know that you are growing, maturing and acquiring valuable abilities, strengths and personal qualities that you will no doubt use at some point as you navigate your way along your career path.

via GIPHY