Career in Policy and Public Affairs

Sometimes I find it hard to describe what I do for a living. ‘Policy and public affairs’ isn’t a career path that everyone has heard of, or knows much about. But I think it’s probably one of the most interesting and rewarding careers going.

I loved ancient history and literature at school, and went on to study at the University of Birmingham. After graduating, I was sure that I wanted to work in the public sector, and to do something that used my skills – reading and absorbing information, seeing patterns and analysing situations, and setting out my arguments in writing. After a while tempting for the NHS in an admin role in London, I managed to get onto Birmingham City Council’s graduate programme.

During my time on the graduate programme I worked in several different roles which enabled me to get a sense of what I did – and definitely didn’t want to do in future. It was during a placement in a waste and recycling depot on the outskirts of Birmingham city centre, where I was researching and designing different ways to encourage Brummies to recycle more and throw away less, that I discovered my interest in public policy.

I made a sideways move from working directly in local government to working in higher education policy in London. I wasn’t working for the government department responsible for universities, but for a policy organisation that represents universities – so it was my job to try to influence policy from the outside. I started as a Policy Researcher, and within three and a half years worked my way up to become a Policy Analyst and then a Senior Policy Analyst, eventually managing my own Policy Researcher.

I’m now Aston University’s Policy Advisor. It’s my job to know what is going on in the political world outside, and work out how it might impact on Aston. It’s also my job to find ways of letting policymakers know about all of the excellent work that goes on in Aston. Life as a Policy Advisor is often varied and always interesting. One day I might be watching a parliamentary debate live online to see what the government Minister is saying about universities, the next I’ll be responding to a consultation on what Brexit will mean for the UK’s higher education sector, and another day I’ll be drafting letters to send to MPs about an exciting development at Aston University, or organising a roundtable discussion event.

One of the great things about policy as a career path is that you realise policy roles are all around you, and your skills are really transferrable. As well as the option of working within government or with a particular politician, pretty much any organisation that interacts with government in some way, whether in the public, private or charity sector, will need people to run their policy and public affairs operation.

If you have developed the right skills and experience – like being able to read and digest lengthy and complex reports, analyse what a government announcement will mean for a sector in practice, think how a politician might think, or write a persuasive letter – in a way it doesn’t matter what context you are working in. You can learn that detail of the job as you go along.

 

My advice for anyone thinking about a career in policy is:

  • When it comes to job hunting or looking for work experience, think outside the box – it’s not just government that has policy roles. Universities, charities of all kinds, political parties, think tanks and representative bodies do too. And it doesn’t have to be in London if that’s not your scene.
  • Your career can be incredibly varied, so don’t pigeon hole yourself into one area of policy. I moved straight from environmental policy to higher education policy so I know it can be done.
  • Do your research and keep up to date with current affairs. If you’re applying for a policy role, have a look at the organisation’s recent news releases or blogs, find out which government departments they interact with and which politicians are in charge, and read one of their recent speeches. This will impress recruiters and show that you have already thought about their policy challenges.

Lizzy Woodfield

Policy Advisor, Aston University

If students would like to talk to someone to gain some advice on how to break into a career in policy, or to discuss any other aspects of their career planning, do book an appointment with a careers consultant via Aston Futures (www.aston.ac.uk/careers

My advice…

Hi guys! 

I thought I would share with you some advice and tips to help you on your journey at Aston.

Being at Aston University is a very exciting experience, I know it was for me. Aston has so much to offer – you need to ensure you make the most out of your time here, take up new opportunities and get involved!

So here are some key tips from my experience at Aston…

Tip 1. Open your emails

I know being a student can get extremely busy, trying to manage lectures, studying, group-work, sleeping and socialising etc. And the last thing you want to do is to read through emails. However, always open university emails because they do contain a lot of important information and OPPORTUNITIES!

Image result for email memes

Tip 2. Peer Mentoring Scheme

Sometimes as a student you want guidance from a friend who has already been in your shoes, experienced things before you, and just someone to tell you it’s all going to be OK. This is why the peer mentoring scheme is so helpful.

I have been involved in the peer mentoring scheme since my first year. Each year I was assigned to a mentor who was also doing the same course as me, who would guide and help me with anything and everything. It has been a great scheme to make friends, gain help and advice. I even took up the opportunity to become a mentor myself – to give something back to the university and the students.

Tip 3. Extra opportunities/jobs

I was always looking for new opportunities and things to get involved in. For example, on many occasions I got casual/part-time work as a university tour guide and helped with jobs over the holidays, and got paid! (Opportunities were found at the JobShop).

Tip 4. Join Societies

Again, make sure you join societies and clubs! They are a great way to socialise, make friends, gain experience and responsibility. I joined Aston’s Sikh Society and in my second year I was lucky enough to make it on to the committee as Events and Marketing Coordinator.

Tip 5. Careers+Placements

Now when it comes to looking for a placement, a lot of us leave it till last minute. However, do get in touch with Careers+Placements as soon as possible. They offer a range of services and resources in helping you find your placement. I visited the centre many times to get advice from the careers consultants, get my CV and cover letter checked, and attended their careers events. I used Aston Futures (Careers+Placements online platform to search for job vacancies and events) to apply for placements and eventually secured one through them as well!

Being proactive and getting involved has really boosted my CV and EMPLOYABILITY!

And so to some it all up, take advantage of what Aston has to offer and build an unforgettable and valuable experience for yourself.

Thanks for reading!

Kiran 😊

Joining the IT industry from a non-IT background

Maya Modi

 

 

I graduated in BSc English Language from Aston University in 2016 with the intention to study Medicine post-graduation. I’m now an I.T Consultant.

 
 

 

 

I know what you’re thinking and trust me, they are linked. In this blog post, I hope that my story inspires you to consider post-graduate career options that are out of the box. You’d be surprised how fitting your work and academic experience to date can be in an industry you had never seen yourself working in before.

 

I chose to study English Language in preparation to do a Masters in Speech Pathology after – something I’d wanted to do for a good seven years now. I was dedicated and was lucky enough to secure lots of placements to support my application later. I also worked for the NHS at the time, which gave me real-time clinical experience. Speech Pathology is a small but vital sector within the allied health professionals unit of the NHS, but being exposed to trauma and other departments in the hospital made me fall in love with general medicine. I spent a lot of time deliberating whether I should drop out of my course in second year and reapply to Medical school, as there was no point continuing with my degree if I knew I didn’t want to use it for a Masters, like I had originally planned to.

Placement year arrived and I chose to continue with my degree, as I had just secured once in a life time study abroad placements in Spain and Hong Kong. They were the best, most challenging but amazing days of my university experience. As scary as it was to live in a country where I wasn’t fluent in the local language, I got through it and my bravery sparked a new level of ambition within me – I was definitely going to apply to Medical school. I thought my placement year would change my mind about applying, but, if anything, seeing how other people live in the world made me want it more.

Final year came around and I was busy studying for my finals and studying for my Med school entry exams too. On top of everything, there was a strong possibility that I may not get into Med school, so I was applying for my Masters as a backup route and applying to graduate schemes just to explore all options. There was no guarantee that any of these options would work out on their own, which is why I applied to all at the same time to see what route worked out best. I’m very much someone who needs to have a forward plan and cannot rely on chance (I’ve learned that it’s OK to be this way), so I did everything I could to ensure that I was either doing a postgrad degree or working upon my pending graduation. In this time, I visited lots of careers fairs to chat with delegates and explore the “what if?” options. I had some interesting conversations and some that put me off post grad working life altogether. One careers fair stood out to me in particular – a careers fair aimed at females looking to go into I.T, but with career discussions over afternoon tea. It was the most interesting concept for a careers fair and the most valuable to me – as it’s where I started my relationship with my current employer (and I got free cake!).

The delegates from Capgemini reassured me that I didn’t need to have a technical background to join a technology consultancy firm. My people skills, ability to work under pressure and quick learning skills that I developed from working in health were all factors that are required when consulting. Consulting can either take the route of being functional or technical, whereas it’s thought to be mostly technical. I applied to Capgemini shortly after the careers fair and to my surprise, I got the job. I accepted with the intention to still take my medical entry exams, but the option of not studying for another four years and adding to my tuition debt seemed more and more viable.

Now, it may seem as if my decision to drop the Doctor dream was money influenced, but hear me out. I realised that as a technology consultant, I can influence medical technologies to the NHS and work on projects that help to restructure their current business models, leading to efficient strategies. This is crucial to the NHS in the current state and unfortunately, as a doctor, I wouldn’t have as much of an influence at a business level as I do now. A year on at Capgemini and a ton of learning under my belt, I’m finally moving onto projects that will allow me to carry this out.

Sometimes, you have to reroute your plans to achieve your goals. I may not be a doctor and I do miss the patient contact, but my consulting is ultimately going to save lives and this is the most satisfying thing to me.

My Mentor Changed My Life..

Whilst everyone begins gearing up to face exams over the next couple of months, I have been reflecting upon all I have achieved during my second year at Aston University, a university that continues to do a wonderful job of providing its students with opportunities to enhance their employability skills and to excel expectations.

Yesterday I was awarded “Most Progressed Mentee” by the Aston University Professional Mentoring scheme, all thanks to the unwavering support of my excellent mentor Chris Lewis. A member of the Aston University Alumni himself, Chris’s outstanding advice and guidance has been pivotal to me in achieving my goals throughout this academic year.

With his support, some of my proudest accomplishments of the year (in no particular order) include:

  • Being voted as “Most Progressed Mentee of the Year” on the Aston University Professional Mentoring scheme.
  • Securing interviews with several companies and obtaining an industrial placement with Grant Thornton, with a team I’m looking forward to working with and values I am proud to represent!
  • Making it to the penultimate stage of Enterprise-Rent-A-Car’s Management Undergraduate of the Year Award, out of hundreds of applicants!
  • Participating in the Aston University Carbon Journey, and being one of the minority of students awarded 10 bonus credits for completing all components of a module named “Developing a Low Carbon World”, in which I learned about many aspects of climate-change and sustainability, from carbon capture technology to health policy and corporate responsibility.
  • Being Project Leader for one of the three projects on the Aston University Enactus Team. Over the past year, The VOICE Project has created memories that my team and I will always cherish, and whist we never fully obtained all the outcomes we had hoped to achieve, every single second of the countless hours we spent on the project have been worthwhile. The many real-life business and life skills we have learned along the way have far surpassed theoretical learning.
  • Being voted as “Most Dedicated Member of the Team” by the Enactus Aston Team with respect for the work I put as Project Manager for The VOICE Project.
  • Attending “IT’s Not Just for the Boys!” a professional event promoting female participation in the IT industry, hosted by JPMorgan in Canary Wharf in conjunction with Target Jobs.
  • Being granted a place on the University of Cambridge Judge Business School’s “Introduction to Social Ventures” course. I am still awestruck by how what I learned in those 3 days has been relevant to such a wide range of experiences this year.
  • Participating in the fabulous UpRising Leadership Programme, where I have been able to experience a host of diverse activities, from meeting with politicians in Parliament, to networking with local professionals and entrepreneurs, to building an awareness of media skills from podcasts to PR, all whilst developing a social action campaign along the way! Our team was successful in presenting our pitch and winning the funding required to start up our campaign SIGNPOST Birmingham, and we are now working on implementation.
  • Attending the Annual Enactus UK Training Programme at Grantham, where I attended several training sessions, as well as being able to meet with hundreds of outstandingly talented young people from across the country.

My mentor Chris’s boundless positivity and can-do attitude has spurred me on throughout the year. He has been patient and understanding, all whilst helping me to explore new ideas, stay on-track with my goals, and even to set a few more for the next academic year (learning as much as I can about the industry I will be working in, learning to drive, building a stronger network, gaining relevant certified qualifications/skills, and becoming a mentor myself, among others).

I can’t begin to recommend the Aston University Professional Mentoring programme highly enough, and I hope that some of you reading this might feel inspired to try it out for yourselves next year. I am happy to say that, whist the programme is now over for this year, my mentee/mentor journey has just begun!

Finding a Graduate Job 🎓

Hi guys, welcome to my first blog post 🙂

I’m Kiran, now an Aston graduate – YAY! I studied Business & Management and graduated in July. I am also very pleased to say that I secured a graduate role in the Careers+Placements team at Aston University, as Student Engagement Coordinator.

Job hunting

So, after my exams finished in May, I had a few weeks off to recuperate after years of studying! I then got my CV checked and approved by visiting a C+P drop-in session and meeting with a careers consultant (the C+P centre hold weekly drop-in sessions to help graduates with any career related queries, CV checks and tips etc.).

I then began applying for marketing related jobs on websites such as, Aston Futures, Graduate Advantage, Gradcracker, LinkedIn, and even sent personal emails to companies of interest.

The phone call

There I was lying on the couch, engrossed in an episode of ‘Breaking Bad’, when I got the call! It was a member of the C+P team inviting me for an interview – I was over the moon! 😀 After all of those endless applications I had finally got a call back.

Interview

On the day of my interview I ensured I wore smart clothes – black trousers and a white blouse – can’t go wrong. I made sure that I took a copy of my CV and my portfolio of previous work. I got to the interview ten minutes early (which seemed like forever because I was nervous). The interview went really well, I spoke about my achievements, previous jobs and education, and showcased some pieces of work from my portfolio. A question I find that always crops up in interviews is ‘how well can you work in a team?’, so make sure you always have an answer prepared.

My first day

I started work the following week, my first day was ace! I met so many friendly colleagues from the C+P team. I was given a handover and had some meetings with my team to bring me up to date with things. My manager and the team are so lovely and supportive. Since I’ve started I have been provided with daily updates and resources to make my job easier.

I have already got stuck into so much. I’ve been here three weeks and have already had a team away day which was so much fun, and I have a team lunch coming up.

So, I would like to congratulate those of you who have secured your graduate roles and best of luck to those still searching! Don’t worry it’s still not too late, keep at it and get in touch with the C+P team!

– Kiran 🙂

Blog Series (6): The Ending

Everything eventually comes to an end, as is my placement. I am now preparing to complete my handover, any campaigns that need to be tied and of course promoting my role for the next placement student. The time goes quickly so make the most of it, I am happy to say I feel as though I have made the most of my placement, I’ve taken part in various campaigns and also been given the chance to manage them on my own as well as, being able to gain some experience on Photoshop, WordPress, Hootsuite, being given full access to our social media accounts, learning how to update and manage the Careers+Placements website and app.

I have taken part in away days, I’ve been able to visit Aston Villa Stadium, gone on Christmas meals and lunches, meetings with key players around the university and had the chance to meet the Vice Chancellor of the university. My placement has taught me how to network, how to build my confidence up for a graduate job and let’s face it as a university student this has been my most productive year of all.

The end is near, a little dramatic but it truly is, I feel ready to transition back into university and feel far more confident knowing that this will be my final year, before my placement I was always unsure, slightly lazy, had ambition but didn’t know how to exactly get to where I wanted, but now I feel as though I’m ready to get that degree and move on. I want to work as I have seen the benefits of working, like anything you will feel stressed or overwhelmed but that’s just life, and you will get through it.

Placement search can be hard, off-putting and difficult but if you find the right placement for you, then all that hard work will pay off, working for the Careers+Placements department at Aston has been a great experience and I can only hope the next bunch of placement students enjoy their placement as much as I did and remember, if you don’t manage to get the role that I am currently in, then don’t stop searching, ask for feedback on your interview and application process and learn from it.

 

I the ‘not so chronically lazy’ placement student have come towards the end of my journey.

Good luck to you all, I hope you find the placement you were looking for!

City Year Testimonial

I am Nasima Akter and I proudly serve on Team Imagination at Ormiston Forge Academy in West Midlands.

A 20 year old undergraduate, psychology placement student, from the area of Birmingham. I attended Holly Lodge High School where I also completed my A-Levels, at which point I acquired a huge passion for teaching and learning, especially for the social science subjects. To the extent that, I would tutor my fellow peers in my sixth form – I delivered lessons to my psychology class and, produced and marked past papers by my peers, under the supervision of the teacher. This furthered my interest in pursuing a Psychology degree at Aston University when I came across City Year whilst searching for placements during my second year. City Year was the only organisation that appealed to me during this process, as I loved every aspect of it, and I eagerly wanted to be a part of this. My fear during this point was that if I do not get this position, I have nothing to fall back on (I only applied for this one placement!) because this was what I excitedly wanted to do; it ticked all the boxes of what I was looking for in a placement and what I intend to go into in the future. After I graduate, I aim at completing a teaching degree for higher education and teaching young adults. I believe City Year has provided me with the right skills and mindset, as I have gained an immense amount of unforgettable experience during my placement, that will only be of support in the future.

Being at school every day brings new experiences and memories that I am certain I can take and keep forever – whether it’s a nice comment a student made, or events established by myself and the team and the message it leaves behind – our legacy.

During my time at school, I had the chance to attend trips with the students in different years and that helped them understand my role and become familiar with a new face around the school. My team and I, organised a charity drive on behalf of the school, which was a success, to the point that the local community acknowledged this and contributed with passion and gratitude. We also organised a bake sale that raised £150+ in one day! One student brought in 100 cupcakes – surely that’s something to remember and be proud of!
Working here gave us the opportunity to do a lot to help the students and the school, with exciting ideas every other day: designing and creating murals, organising clubs.

However, challenging situations is something nobody wants to experience, it is a thing we need to learn to overcome as individuals and a recurring challenge I faced was getting across any point or message to the students. The reason why this was hard for me was because being such a short person around almost every student who is taller than me, it was scary approaching taller and older year group students (even teachers sometimes!). However, with time, I built a relationship with many diverse individuals and a problem I once had that was always a bother, soon disappeared.

This led to many successes I became a part of and a success which has always assured me that, yes, I can do this. I can make a difference, was regarding a student I mentor – one with very poor attendance. By working with her on a one-to-one basis, I addressed this issue and helped improve her attendance rate. From the experience of shadowing and working alongside the pastoral team at the school who deal with attendance daily, I learnt how to appropriately provide regular interventions making her aware of how this negatively impacts her curriculum. She was understanding of this and made a promise to me “I’ll keep a promise to you Miss Akter, that I’ll come to school every day and I don’t break my promises”, which till this day she has kept. As her City Year mentor, I am proud of the positive changes she has made and the amazing impact it has had on her behaviour and curriculum, and this will help shape her attendance and behaviour during her GCSE’s.
As a volunteer mentor at City Year, it brings its good and bad moments, but in my case, a lot of good moments has outweighed any bad ones, which I am grateful for! Being in contact with students, most likely the same ones every day, means they have the chance to get used to working with me and so when it comes to a point when I am not there, they ask. They ask again and again for me to attend their lessons, they want me to only work with them, they place trust in me and they become happy upon seeing me anywhere during the school day. I love the bond I have created with the students and will surely be one of the most remarkable things I will miss when I leave. Many students were inspired by me and this motivated me to not let them down, so I always thrived for the best so they too can succeed, with and without me.

During the year, I had the opportunity to attend networking events with City Year business partners such as The Challenge and NCS. As well as this, I had the chance to present at an impact breakfast, to a room crammed with 40+ business investors, some who know and others who didn’t know anything about City Year and the purpose. During this breakfast, I spoke about the school I am based at, and the impact we have had in the school so far, mainly the impact on attendance. This was an amazing experience and helped with my presentation skills and speaking at a balanced pace. Finally, another event I had the privilege to be part of, included the City Year dinner which involves an evening with investors and young people who are keen to find out more about City Year and become a part of this grow.

Although City Year is about helping students from different backgrounds, it is also for our own development and I can proudly say I have learnt through experience how to lead especially, and effectively. Anyone can lead, but it means nothing if there is no confidence in yourself but doubt, and this is what I overcame – I believed in myself, and had passion every time I spoke. This was shown through leading an extra-curricular sports club for the students as well as planning and delivering morning sessions to a group of students in year nine. From the training we receive every Friday, it helped me placed down the theory of what I learnt to reality during school and have always proved to be effective. Especially, because I am terrible in Maths, that quite often I would inform others I’m more likely to hinder a person’s progress than aid it! But, after receiving training on Maths and how to deal with situations, allowed me to observe what to do next and how to tackle this, from which I gained transferable skills on adapting and suitability.

Overall, I have come a long way battling through struggles I have faced, whilst gaining experience and new skills at the same time, as well as with my team members, with whom I’ve created relationships with that will not cease to exist after we have finished our year of service. Working in a school that’s based in a small community, made us all, in fact, become part of a close-knit community; where everyone knows each other and now about City Year and the bigger picture of why we are there. This has provided me with a sense of purpose; I know I am always welcome back here, and I know what I wish to do, which is to help young adults become integrated into society and have a sense of purpose and value. Being in a school that entails cultures and backgrounds different to what I have grown up around, furthered my knowledge and understanding of other cultures and perspectives. As well as this, I have broadened the mind of many students who are ambitious to learn. They were keen to learn about fasting in the month of Ramadan and some were inspired to experiment and try fasting for a day. This goes to show how eager they are to learn about different religions and traditions and accept individuals wholeheartedly.

City Year has motivated me to get involved in work like this; volunteering in other organisations etc. and quite specifically, it has inspired me to volunteer with ex-offenders on a mentoring programme.

If I can make a change in one person’s life, that is one more person who may decide to bring a positive change to someone else.

 

Blog series (5): 6 months in …. The halfway line

Disclaimer: This post is an edited version of my previous post (6 months in) I am now way past the halfway line!

It seems like only yesterday I was on Aston Futures searching for a placement, yet here I am almost 6 months into my Placement Year, half the year done! Already I have begun preparing myself for my assignment and believe you me, it’s not as easy as you think it would be. When going on a placement at times you can feel disconnected from the university. Regardless of working in my place of study, for the longest time I have felt disconnected. This is not a bad thing, this is just a part of me growing up and working hard. It may come to a time where you feel as though, your placement has somewhat matured you, for me, this is exciting as I feel I have finally developed the mindset I need to delve into my final year.

6 months into my placement and I have established a range of skills, I never thought I could develop until after graduation, I have built up my confidence and self-esteem considerably and I have now learnt to trust myself more than any other person in this world, in the world of work, you are relied upon and in order to really succeed, you must also rely on yourself first and foremost to get the job done.

As the New Year approaches, I can truly say that my placement has made me proud of who I have become and the best part is that I still have 6 months to go. During this time, I have taken part in a range of networking events where I have had the opportunity to liaise with other employers and colleagues, I have contributed to several important meetings and will soon have the chance to chair a meeting of my own. I have also contributed to a few ‘employer away days’ where the team gets together to discuss progress, issues and future campaigns. This by far has been one of the most engaging factors for me, as during this period you are required to think critically about all that has been achieved in the past and how this can be improved in the short/long term. During this period of time you are required to analyse and communicate effectively with other members of the team, it is during this point you come to realise that in order to provide a seamless service, it is essential the team takes time away from the office to brainstorm and discuss a range of innovative ideas to
bring about great change.

Not only have I learnt a range of new things I have also met some great people and made a tonne of new memories with some new friends. Working in an environment where you are joined by other placement students not only provides you with the moral support you may need, but it just makes the placement all the more fun and interesting. As we all study at Aston I have made friends on my course who I never knew of before and the best part is that we can all help each other with our assignments! The past 6 months have been a treat and I cannot wait to come back in the New Year to see what it may bring.

Remember, don’t be afraid of success, now is the time to push yourselves, now is the time to really do great things – The ‘not so chronically lazy’ placement student.

Stay tuned to read about coming to the end of my placement journey next Monday.

Interested in this placement position? Head on over to Aston Futures and use the Job ID – 20885 to apply!

Blog Series (4): The first day

 

Disclaimer: Take this with a pinch of salt, your day could be a little or very different! 

I got the ‘Yes’ in May and started in July which was still a little time away, I was nervous, to say the least. I got on the train and made my way to Aston, when working as staff the environment completely changes, you are no longer that student who gets late for their lectures, or who walks into the Main Building only to walk back out, you are staff and as staff you are required to be there on time, well dressed and ready for the day.

It is likely that your manager will greet you when you come in and help you get settled at your desk, you will then be taken around the department and be introduced to your colleagues, don’t worry if you forget names,  soon all will be familiar, after all the handshakes and formal introductions you will be taken back to your desk.

At this point, things get real, real quick! You’ll be given a timeline of plans and comms that the team have been working on, what you need to work on and what your targets will be. You will be given a handover, for instance, I will create a handover document for the next placement student so they know how I did things, what they need to do and just to give them that bit of advice from placement students to placement student and then you will be given a fairly easy task to help you get familiar with the role.

Oh, and of course you will be given your log-ins, an email account, a staff card and just to warn you, they do not give you a chance to smile coherently for the picture, so be sure to have your ‘I’m ready for a picture’ face on at all times and you will also need to create a message for your voicemail … mines is dreaded, thank god no one really calls me!

The first day was great I did not feel too overwhelmed, as I was eased into the role, at least for a good month! They really do give you the time to settle, you are also given a ‘buddy’ which is another colleague in the department who you can talk to if you do not feel ready to approach matters with your manager or do not know how to.

The first day now seems like a blur, I do remember feeling lonely, however, as I had not befriended any colleagues at this point and my friends had not moved back to university, it was a lonely time at the start as other placement students had not yet started either. However, in due to time I have met the best placement students, staff and made some great friends, make sure to integrate with your team and don’t be afraid to introduce yourself to your placement colleagues.   

Your first day will be great, it will be normal to feel nervous, but just remember like with anything you’ll adjust and feel at home before you know it!

Stay tuned to read about my journey 6 months in this Thursday

The ‘not so chronically lazy’ placement student.

Interested in this placement position? Head on over to Aston Futures and use the Job ID – 20885 to apply!

 

Blog Series (3): The Call

 

The call … we all wait for that one call… to tell us we ‘got the job’ but sometimes that doesn’t happen for some of us. During my search for a placement I had been rejected a countless number of times, sometimes it just became a daily ‘no’ and so this time, I didn’t hold my breath. I remember getting the call perhaps a couple days after the interview as they had various assessment centres going on. I was in my flat, sleeping the exhaustion away as I had been revising, sitting exams and writing up assignments as well as attending interviews. I remember my phone ringing, I was not impressed, who would ring me at such an ungodly hour? I didn’t recognise the number… Aston? I sat up straight and put on my professional voice.

Within moments I was told that the job was mine for the taking! I was ecstatic. Now when taking a call with an employer who has offered you a job, it is important you maintain some level of professionalism and don’t go off on a tangent thanking them 5,6,7,8,9,10 times and perhaps its best to just ask a few questions to show you’re well aware of what will happen next.

  • When will my start date be?
  • What documents must I bring in?
  • When will the documents need to be given in?
  • Do I need to let my Placement Coordinator know? Which yes you do, probably best to only ask an Aston employer this question as they can guide you on exactly what you need to do, but do pop into Careers+Placements if you are ever unsure.

And then you can put the phone down, squeal and celebrate! Oh and do tell them you ‘look forward to working with the team’ it just leaves a friendly impression!

To those of you reading this, unfortunately only one of you will get ‘the call’ for this role but don’t be disheartened take it as a learning curve and you will get ‘the call’ soon!

Stay tuned to read about my first day on the job next Monday!

 

The ‘not so chronically lazy’ placement student

Interested in this placement position? Head on over to Aston Futures and use the Job ID – 20885 to apply!